Spectroscope

Psychology

Accession Number: 2012.psy.104.a-b

Instrument Name: Spectroscope

Description:

Component A: The instrument is mounted on a three-legged iron stand 18 cm tall. The instrument consists of a central cylinder in which several prisms would have been housed. Two 26 cm tubular arms with optical components radiate from the central cylinder horizontally. Another shorter optical component, 7 cm long, is also attached to the cylinder. A large cylindrical weight on a steel rod extends from the base of the central cylinder.

Component B: A small box containing three broken prisms from the spectroscope.

Alternative Name:

Primary Materials: Iron, brass, glass

Markings:

The lid is engraved “Franz Schmidt & Haensch, Berlin, Germany.”

Dimensions (cm): Height = 33, Width = 30, Length = 59

Function:

Used to measure the properties of light over a specific portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, typically used in spectroscopic analysis to identify materials

Condition:

Good. Slight amounts of corrosion. Tape gum on one leg. Masking tape attached to lid.

Associated Instruments:

2012.psy.104.b – Prisms, broken; 2012.psy.86, another spectroscope

Manufacturer:

Franz Schmidt & Haensch, Berlin, Germany

Date of Manufacture:

Provenance:

Dept. of Psychology, University of Toronto

Donated to UTSIC: No

Historical Notes:

1) University of Toronto Department of Psychology. Spectroscope. Available from http://www.psych.utoronto.ca/museum/spectroscope.htm. (Accessed Apr 4, 2012)

2) Baird, J. W., and R. J. Richardson (1900). A case of abnormal colour sense, with special reference to the space threshold of colours, University of Toronto Studies, Psychological Series, A. Kirschmann (Ed.), Vol. 1. Toronto: Librarian of the University of Toronto.

3) Boring, E. G. (1942). Sensation and Perception in the History of Experimental Psychology. New York: Appleton -Century. p. 155.

4) Titchener, (1915) Experimental Psychology, a Manual of Laboratory Practice: Volume II. Quantitative Experiments, Part II. Instructor’s Manual. New York: MacMillan. p. 39.