Ionization Gauge

Astronomy

Accession Number: 2017.ast.43 (DAA-0026)

Instrument Name: Ionization Gauge

Description:

This item is contained inside soft, paper packaging in a brown rectangular cardboard box.

The object is a glass tube with a bulbous lower portion and a narrower upper portion. At the top of the upper tube is fitted with a cork stopper. at the base of this tube there is an apparent join; here, the glass is blue.

In the lower portion there is a small electronic component consisting of a metal cylinder through which three wires pass, having entered through the base of the lower component. Inside the cylinder there is an assembly of spiral wires. The cylinder is connected to the top by two prongs and a rod that sticks out the top of the lower bulb.

Primary Materials: Glass, Iron Alloy, Paper, Card

Markings:

Stamped on each side of the box: “IONIZATION GAUGE
TYPE VG-2
DISTILLATION PRODUCTS INC.”

On a sticker stuck to the box: “CONSOLIDATED MOVING
THE PROFESSIONALS
416-922-9595 THE BOX SPOT 416489-4548″

Written in pen on this label is: “FRAGILE Glass IONIZATION GAUGE”

A number has been written on the box: “8034″

On the glass surface of the bulb portion of the object: “IONIZATION GAUGE
TYPE VG-2
DISTILLATION PRODUCTS, INC.”

On the reverse side: “807″

Dimensions (cm): Box: 18.3cm x 7.5cm x 7.5cm

Function:

An ionization gauge is a low-pressure measurement instrument. It functions through the measurement of the current created by ionized particles made through the collision of electrons with particles in the chamber surrounding the components. The current produced is amplified, and measured with an electrometer.

Condition:

Excellent. The object and box are in very good condition, and appear complete. The packaging material, while crumpled, is in good condition as well.

Manufacturer: c. 1940s

Date of Manufacture: Distillation Products Inc., New York

Provenance:

This object was likely moved from the David Dunlap Observatory in Richmond Hill in 2008, upon the sale of the observatory. It was stored at the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics until 2017, when it was moved to a new storage location in McLennan Physical Laboratories.

Donated to UTSIC: No