Compass graduated in degrees

Physics

Accession Number: 2016.ph.733

Instrument Name: Compass graduated in degrees

Description:

A large round compass graduated in degrees from 0-90 in each quadrant. The top is glass with a beveled edge. The needle rests on a metal pin set through a brass support. The progress of the needle is impeded by a metal barrier that rotates with the needle and prevents it from rotating more than 180 degrees. The base of the compass is black plastic. The edges are brass.

Primary Materials: Brass, glass, paper, metal, plastic

Markings:

On the surface of the dial, the compass rim is divided into degree markings from 0-90 in each quadrant of the compass. Each of these graduations is divided into ten smaller sections, marking out individual degrees.

In the centre of the dial: “THE CAMBRIDGE AND PAUL INSTRUMENT CO. LTD. ENGLAND.”

Below that: “PATENTED.”

On the brass edge surround, scratched into the metal: “681.A”

On a sticker applied to the glass: “N2076 Prof McLennan.”

Dimensions (cm): Diameter=10cm, Depth=2.5cm

Condition:

Very good. Aside from the scratched and applied sticky labels, the compass is in excellent condition.

Manufacturer:

Cambridge & Paul Instrument Company Ltd.

Date of Manufacture: 1920-1924

Provenance:

This object was discovered in 2016 among UTSIC’s collection in a box filled with items related to physics professor John Satterly, along with another object (2016.ph.732). It is perhaps an item John Satterly kept to commemorate Professor John McLennan, or an item related to Satterly himself

Donated to UTSIC: No